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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Cawker City Public Record

Articles in database from Cawker City Public Record:    40

Dr. W. D. Jenkins died at Cawker City on the 22nd. ...
August 9, 1894, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2898)

Dr. W. D. Jenkins died at Cawker City on the 22nd. He was at one time editor of the Smith County Pioneer and later editor of the Kirwin Chief. It was the earliest experience of the editor of this paper to dip his pen in wormwood and fling it at the Doctor in a continuous quarrel over some forgotten trifle after which the two became good friends. We regret his death. -- Norton Champion.

"Mrs. Emma B. Alrich of Cawker City, Kan., associate editor of the Public Record and president of the Kansas Woman's Press Association, was among the guests here yesterday. She is a native of New Jersey...." -- Monmouth (N.J.) Democrat.

 

A brief dispatch in our last issue announced that ...
March 7, 1895, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2922)

A brief dispatch in our last issue announced that Mrs. Emma B. Alrich of this city was elected president of the Department of Kansas, Woman's Relief Corps. She was elected on the first ballot by the largest vote ever given the president of that order, receiving 207 out of a total of 287 votes cast. For months before the convention, Mrs. A. had been receiving endorsements from all over the state and the result shows how loyally they stood by her. Mrs. A. was one of the charter members of the National W.R.C. when it was organized in 1883, and has been an earnest worker for the order and its precepts ever since....The president has the appointment of her secretary, and her daughter, Rachel C. Alrich, received that appointment and was duly installed....On the announcement of election of Mrs. Alrich, a committee was appointed by W. C. Whitney, past commander, and Mrs. Mary Buist, president of the Reynolds Corps, to arrange for a reception to the new department president, and last night was the time chosen. A committee of 10 members from the post and corps were sent to the depot and escorted the party to the house. A general invitation was extended to the public...and the committee made elaborate preparations....A large number of friends attended and congratulated the new president.

 

The North Central Kansas Editorial Association hel ...
April 25, 1895, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2923)

The North Central Kansas Editorial Association held its annual business meeting at Concordia last week....Col. N. B. Brown acted as toastmaster and, interspersing his own remarks, while his partner, Mrs. Wilfong, who is president of the association, and Mrs. Dudley, the librarian, saw that the plans were carried out nicely....The editors "talked shop," Discussed the paper read, and elected the following officers: President, Gomer Davies, Republic City; vice-president, W. S. Tilton, Osborne; secretary, Mrs. Ollie Royce, Phillipsburg; treasurer, D. Marshall, Concordia....The women of Cloud County, who work so faithfully in the newspaper work, whether at desk, case, or press, Mrs. Mary. L. Rupe of the Clyde Herald and Mrs. Mary Burton of the Kansan, were there also, as was Mrs. W. H. Nelson of the Smith County Pioneer, who is as modest as the wife of the president of the State Editorial Association as she is about taking credit for her share of work on their paper.

Volume XIII. With this issue, the Record begins its 13th year under the present management, and is in its 23rd year as the direct successor to the Tribune. No other paper has been published for that length of time in Cawker City....

 

The consolidation of the Kansas Newspaper Union wi ...
May 16, 1895, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2925)

The consolidation of the Kansas Newspaper Union with the Western Newspaper Union greatly inconvenienced many publishers in the north part of the state who patronized the former house. The Lincoln Republican was obliged to publish half a sheet, and says, "All the words in Webster's Dictionary would not express our feelings in the matter, and all the ---- ---- ---- in the country wouldn't represent one-half of what ought to be said to the chuckle-heads who are responsible for it."

The Record's Pedigree -- Tribune established 1873, Echo established 1875, Free Press established 1878, Record established 1883.

 

In the office of the Cawker Record can be seen the ...
July 11, 1895, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2927)

In the office of the Cawker Record can be seen the Campfire, the first soldier paper started in Kansas, in August 1882 by L. L. Alrich, and published by him until November 1883. -- Harry Root in the Champion.

 

W. H. Nelson has temporarily relinquished the mana ...
August 0, 1895, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2929)

W. H. Nelson has temporarily relinquished the management of the Smith Center Pioneer to A. L. Topliff, who has been engaged on the Journal of that city. Mr. Topliff, formerly editor of the Echo of this city, and with the extended experience he has had, ought to keep the Pioneer up to its present standing.

 

On this morning's mail, A. G. Alrich, foreman of t ...
January 7, 1897, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2971)

On this morning's mail, A. G. Alrich, foreman of the Journal job composing rooms, received letters patent on a 'page stick' for the use of printers in making up books or pamphlets where it is necessary to have the pages all of the same length. The application for the patent was made some time ago, and Mr. Alrich has been working on it for three years. In getting the patent there were a number of things to interfere with the speedy closing up of the case, for while there is nothing like the invention in use in the printing offices of the country, the 'stick' is a sort of gauge, and in this manner came into competition with other gauges used in other lines....The papers bear the date of December 29th, 1896. Its number is 574,123....He made a number of models, and some of the first ones have been in use in the Journal office for some time.... -- Lawrence Journal.

 

Sol Miller, the oldest editor in continuous servic ...
April 22, 1897, Cawker City Public Record (ID 2981)

Sol Miller, the oldest editor in continuous service in Kansas, died last Saturday at his home in Troy. His paper, the Troy Chief, is the oldest in the state; it was established by him 40 years ago at White Cloud. His biography, written and published about a year ago in his own paper, is now serving in his obituary notices. Geo. W. Martin, editor of the Kansas City (Kan.) Gazette, speaking of Editor Miller, says: "I have known Sol for the past 35 years. He was one of the most characteristic editors in Kansas. He could say things in print that no other man could say and I have always had my doubts whether he could say them anywhere but in Troy. Everything he wrote was fresh, original and fearless. I remember articles that he wrote as long ago as 1862 and 1863, in which his ability as a writer was then clearly demonstrated. When I first visited his office, there was some shelving near the ceiling which contained the most remarkable collection of newspaper clippings I ever saw. No public man ever existed in Kansas as of whom he did not have every item in his history at his tongue's end. It was in all these clippings which he could lay his hands on at any moment....Until he was made a member of the state board of public works, he was never west of Topeka in Kansas."

 

...
June 13, 1901, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4740)

After an existence of seventeen years and five months, the North-central Kansas Editorial Association returns to the place of its birth -- Cawker City. The original title was the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association....The organization is the oldest continuous editorial association in the state. The editors meet June 17 and 18 in the same building in which the association was organized January 15, 1884, but it is enlarged....

The following report, published in the Record, January 17, 1884, may be of interest to our readers as well as members of the association: In response to a call made December 18, 1883, to the editors of northwest Kansas to meet at Cawker City, January 15, 1884, eighteen of the fraternity met last Tuesday in this city.

The following were in attendance: W. H. Caldwell, Beloit Courier; Lew C. Headley, Gaylord Herald; C. H. Topliff, Osborne News; W. H. Whitmore, Harlan Chief; H. K. Lightfoot, Logan Freeman; J. W. Bliss, Greenleaf Independent Journal; C. J. English, Concordia Republican-Empire; Wm. Bissell, Phillipsburg Herald; A. L. Sears, Concordia; C. F. Lamb, Kirwin Independent; G. D. Baker, Topeka Commonwealth; H. A. Yonge, Beloit Democrat; J. D. Dodge, Beloit Gazette; J. H. Simmons, Norton Courier; Geo. W. Reed, Salem Argus; Geo. E. Dougherty, Downs Times; J. W. McBride, Cawker City Journal; L. L. Alrich, Cawker City Public Record.

The above named gentlemen assembled in Grand Army Hall at 9:00 a.m. and the meeting called to order by electing H. A. Yonge temporary chairman and Lew C. Headley secretary....A committee was appointed to determine the boundaries of the territory...and the following was determined upon: Beginning at the north line of the state and down the east line of Washington, Clay and Dickinson counties, thence west on the south line of Dickinson, Saline, Ellsworth, Russell, Ellis, Trego, Gove, St. John and Wallace counties, thence north to north line of the state, thence east to place of beginning.

...The committee on organization...recommended that the present officers be retained during this session...that this society be known as the North-west Kansas Editorial Association....W. H. Caldwell offered the resolution: That this association in appreciation of the presence and influence of the originators of this meeting, Doc Jenkins of the Kirwin Chief and N. F. Hewett of the Clifton Review, are hereby entitled to our grateful thanks....Election of officers for the permanent organization...resulted in the election of: W. H. Caldwell, president; C. J. English, vice-president northeast; J. H. Simmons, vice-president northwest; H. A. Yonge, vice-president southeast; C. H. Topliff, vice-president southwest; Lew C. Headley, secretary; C. F. Lamb, J. W. Bliss, executive committee....Beloit was chosen as the next place of meeting at 9:00 a.m. the second Tuesday in May....

 

...
June 20, 1901, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4743)

The North-central Kansas Editorial Association held their meetings in this city last Monday and Tuesday. The public exercises as per the program were rendered.

An excellent paper on the "Early Meetings of the North-central" was read by John Q. Royce, showing that he has carefully looked up the history of the association. We quote in part:

Seventeen years and a half ago in this city and in the same building...this association was born. The originators of the meeting were Doctor Jenkins, who then published the Kirwin Chief, and N. F. Hewitt of the Clifton Review. A call was issued on the 18th day of December, 1883....The objects of the association were the promotion of the interests of its members, the cultivation of a better acquaintance of the brothers and sisters of the press, and the annual working of some railroad for an excursion.

The first meeting of this association, occurring two months and a half before I fell from grace and started on the downward course to newspaper fame, I have been compelled to draw quite heavily on Mr. Alrich's paper, the Cawker Record, for much of the information....

As I remember the Record in those days, it occupied a little front room over Buist and Dougherty's hardware across the street. It was edited by a young man and his handsome young wife, who had neither worked in the newspaper nor matrimonial harness so long as they have at this time, but who, as I remember it, published a paper that was a credit to the town, and it must have been fairly profitable, as they have never missed an issue since....

Eighteen of the brightest and best, the creme de la creme of the fraternity at that day, responded to the call....On that 15th day of January, 18 lone men came here to lay the foundation of this splendid association....Only three of the charter members of this association are now engaged in the newspaper business within the limits of the association, as follows: L. C. Headley, L. L. Alrich, and J. W. McBride. Headley and Alrich are publishing the same papers they were at that time, while Mr. McBride has moved to the county seat of the same county...and now publishes the bright and newsy Beloit Times. The other 15 have nearly all gone into some legitimate business, but some are still publishing newspapers in other parts of the country where, let us hope, they are getting

more wood for a year's subscription than they did while here. One of the number, Wm. Bissell, has finished his labors on this earth and has gone to his reward, where the delinquent subscriber will never bother him.

This first meeting was called to order by H. A. Yonge of Beloit, who was at that time in partnership with Tully Scott, a lineal descendant of Mrs. Nation, in the publication of the Beloit Democrat, which at the time of the great political flood was changed to the Call. There were several calls made in those days and in many of the counties there was a race to the death to see which paper first heard the call. Mr. Yonge afterwards worked for Mr. Cleveland in the land office and is now a valued citizen of Kansas City, Kan., where his name appears in the city directory as an attorney at law.

The dates of the succeeding meetings were given by Mr. Royce, interspersed with much interesting matter. At Beloit, May 13, 1884; Minneapolis; Washington; Atchison 1885, Missouri Pacific invitation; Norton, May 21, 1886; Downs, Nov. 12; Concordia, May 1887; Stockton, May 1888; Minneapolis, May 16, 1889; Mankato, May 15, 1890; Clay Center, June 1891; Salina, May 1892; World's Fair, 1893; Beloit, February 1894; Concordia, 1895; Belleville, 1896; Concordia, 1897, 1898; Kansas City, 1899; Smith Center, 1900; Cawker City, June 17-18, 1901.

Carriages for conveying the visiting editors to the Spring and about the city were furnished....The trip to the Waconda Spring terminated at the Public Library building, where the Woman's Hesperian Library Club entertained them for an hour....Lambertz Band gave a concert on the lawn, then formed into line and proceeded to the Opera House, and the first attention given to supper. President Chubbic called for toasts with the following responses:

"Women as journalists," Mrs. Grace L. Snyder. Vocal solo. "The ladies of Cawker City," C. M. White, who insisted that newspaper men owed much of their support to the ladies in every line of work. "Elements of a good country newspaper from a citizen's standpoint," L. S. Tucker. "Our entertainment at Cawker City," J. Q. Royce. "Our guests," Clark A. Smith. Vocal solo. "Reminiscences," Gomer T. Davies, who declared that editors who attend the associations are friendly and do not criticize each other; also that the National Editorial Association has the greatest beneficial influence upon the whole country. President Chubbic said

"Amen" for the benediction....

 

...
July 4, 1901, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4746)

State Historical Society, 1875-1901

At the Second District Editorial Association meeting, held at Ottawa on the 28th, Geo. W. Martin, secretary of the State Historical Society, delivered an address on the work of the society. He said in part:

At a meeting of the State Editorial Association, held at Manhattan, April 7, 1875, D. W. Wilder offered a resolution providing for the organization of a state historical society, and F. P. Baker, D. R. Anthony, John A. Martin, Sol Miller and George A. Crawford were appointed to carry it out; R. B. Taylor, M. W. Reynolds, S. S. Prouty and T. D. Thacher were also active. The committee met and organized December 13, 1875....

The society was organized on non-partisan lines, independent of changing administrations, subject to the control of those who had a taste for the work, with a single purpose of gathering the record and results of all classes, elements, associations and sympathies. The first appropriation was $1,000 by the legislature of 1877. This policy has been affirmed by each succeeding legislature, until now the society is one of the important departments of state, with six salaried employees and an annual expense of $6,640, besides printing.

The society began in a small hole under a stairway, and now it occupies 9,000 square feet in the capitol building. It started with the most meager conveniences; today the executive council under authority of the legislature has provided about $12,000 worth of steel shelving, lock boxes, card cases and plate glass show cases, and $3,000 worth of wood work, of the latest and most elegant patterns.

For 24 years the society had but one secretary, so that I am not talking on myself when I say that it has not only performed a marvelous work in the way of historical collection but it has branched out into the most complete reference library on all sociological questions west of Chicago.

The collection started with a few books donated by Samuel A. Kingman, D. W. Wilder and James M. Harvey, while today it includes 23,907 books, 67,418 pamphlets, 23,907 volumes of newspapers, 23,317 manuscripts, 6,397 relics, 5,030 pictures, 4,886 atlases, maps and charts.

 

...
April 16, 1903, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4803)

The editorial meeting at Beloit -- The people met every train with carriages and conveyed the visitors to places assigned. The visit to the Industrial School was more than a mere commonplace. The sight of 150 loaves of freshly baked bread, and eight cakes, for Sunday supper showed the inner girl was well provide for, and the scarf drill and singing of the Holy City by the entire school was impressive as to the ethical training....Charley Hillebrant of the Osborne Farmer and his bride made the occasion a visit to the home folks, Charley dropping into his accustomed place in the Manifold Band. At the second meeting of the association, held in Beloit in 1884, Andy Manifold welcomed them as mayor and as band leader....Judge R. M. Pickler gave a fine word picture of the "wrinkles" that appear on printers faces and the causes thereof. His is "passed" by all printers needing no correction, and ready for the next edition of the district judgeship. It seemed to be the unanimous expression of the gathering that the value of a county newspaper office cannot be estimate only by actual value of material and machinery; that the personality of the editor makes the paper and cannot be transferred with the stock.

The long promised new form of the Record appears today. We have had many disappointments and aggravations in getting our new press in operation, and the parts are not all here yet, so we still have to contend with difficulties. The makeup of the paper today is not just as we would like it to be, but it will be improved gradually. It is at least better print than from the old hand press.

 

...
April 30, 1903, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4807)

This office is in possession of volume 1, Nos. 2 and 3, of the Osborne County Express, published in this county in March 1872 by Mark J. Kelley. The papers were sent to us last week by some friend who did not give us his name. However, we value them very highly. They have been well preserved, and there is a great deal of interesting news in them, especially for those who lived here at that time. -- Osborne Farmer.

 

...
May 7, 1903, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4809)

F. J. Halanicka (Huliniski?), according to the Globe, has just sold the San Pedro mines for five million dollars, and is now in New York, a member of the firm of Malory, Hulaiski & Burt.

Harry Root in the State Journal: The change in the makeup of the Cawker City Record is satisfactory to the fraternity as well as patrons. It is now a six column quarto instead of a blanket folio, and its print is more readable....

A. L. Topliff published his valedictory in the last issue of the Lebanon Criterion, having sold the business to L. M. Linton, who has bought the Journal of the same place and consolidated the two papers. Topliff was an early resident of Cawker City and published the Echo, one of the predecessors of the Record, and has published other papers since elsewhere, and now bids his final farewell to the newspaper business as his eyesight has about failed him.

 

...
October 0, 1903, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4830)

The printers in the Atchison Globe office recently got into a discussion as to the speed a Washington hand press could be worked. Some of the younger printers had never seen a Washington hand press, so the discussion was confined to the older printers. One (Lyman Roberts) said he could pull off a thousand an hour, two pages, if he had a good roller boy. The others laughed at him and said he couldn't do it; that 240 an hour is quick work.

We have in this office a press of the kind named, on which we printed the Record for 20 years (until last March), doing the press work ourself a dozen years, and we found four a minute (240 an hour) about as rapid as we wanted to work it. Some men we had made the same speed, while others fell under that. But one man who worked it run the papers off at the rate of 330 an hour, and that is about as rapid as the roller boy can get out of the way of the pressman. We still have the old Washington hand press in this office, and still find it very convenient for some work, though not in use for the newspaper. It has done duty in this town 30 years and is as good as new. A press of that kind is good for generations if well cared for.

 

...
March 24, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4858)

Capt. P. H. Coney of Topeka is a candidate for department commander of the G.A.R. and in a biographical sketch of him in the Capital of last Sunday it is stated that: "Captain Coney conceived, founded and published the first exclusively soldier paper published in the west, the National Banner, which was subsequently merged into the Western Veteran." Possibly that is so, but we would like Capt. Coney to "show us." Early in August 1882, we published at Cawker City the first copy of the Camp Fire, devoted to the interests of the Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Kansas. It was eight pages of two wide columns each, and 1,500 copies of it were run off on a little hand job press, one page at a time....The Camp Fire was continued until November 1883, when it was merged into the Record. The complete file of the Camp Fire is in the State Historical rooms....

 

...
March 31, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4860)

In regard to the first soldier paper in the west, which we claimed last week was the Camp Fire, published by us in August 1882, Capt. P. H. Coney of Topeka writes that he published the Reunion Banner in that city just about a year previous. Capt. Coney is therefore entitled to the credit of being the first.

 

...
May 5, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4869)

A writer in an Eastern magazine bemoans the fact that the world has gone crazy over commerce and there are no longer places of solitude where the soul of the poet can retire to commune with nature. Someone ought to tell that heartbroken author about Cawker, Kansas. The solitude is so deep that trains running through the town have to carry snow plows the year around. The above rot recently appeared in Bert Walker's column in the Topeka Capital....The Capital man is paid to attempt to write smart items about Kansas, but he frequently fails and slurs communities that have given their support to the paper he represents; sometimes his items are nearly as sickly as Dodd Gaston's. We hoped better of the young man, and that he would be a worthy successor to the lamented Harmon Wilson....

 

...
May 19, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4872)

Editor Norton of the Downs News called at the Record office last week and examined our new press -- the Galley Universal. He has used a similar press, smaller size, and pronounces it the best press made. That is the opinion of all printers who are posted on presses.

 

...
July 21, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4887)

The associate editor arrived in Cawker July 12, 1879, and has completed a full quarter of a century in your midst...nearly four years in the schoolroom, and over 21 in the Record office; but the last two months have been those of intense anxiety for the editor, whose condition has been such that "Our hopes belied our fears, our fears our hopes belied" as the work of the office and the sick room have alternated day and night. The hope is still strong that the editor

will resume his accustomed place in due time.

 

...
November 17, 1904, Cawker City Public Record (ID 4904)

Colonel D. R. Anthony, the veteran Kansas editor and owner of the Leavenworth Times, died Saturday morning, November 7....

Colonel Anthony was born at South Adams, Mass., in 1824 and in 1854 formed one of the first colonies sent out to Kansas by the New England Emigrant society and he helped found Lawrence. In the fall of 1854, Colonel Anthony returned to the East but...in 1857 he returned to the state, which has been his home ever since. When the war broke out, Anthony enlisted and...was made a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, afterward known as the Seventh Kansas Volunteers.

Colonel Anthony began his active political career in Kansas with the appointment of postmaster for Leavenworth in 1861 by President Lincoln. He held this office for five years and was removed by President Johnson for refusing to support Johnson's policy. Colonel Anthony was first elected mayor of Leavenworth by the Republicans in March 1863...In the year of 1872, Colonel Anthony ran for mayor the sixth time and defeated John McKee and was elected for a term of two years, the charter having been changed. The most exciting incident of this term occurred over the effort to have Negroes vote. Colonel Anthony and other radical

Republicans won and the Negroes have been voting ever since. He made several unsuccessful efforts to secure the Republican nomination for governor. He was a brother of Susan B. Anthony.

 

...
September 13, 1906, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5023)

L. L. Alrich, editor and publisher

Thirty-three years ago today (September 13, 1873) the first number of the Cawker City Weekly Tribune was issued, so the Public Record as successor is 33 years old, the pedigree being -- the Tribune, the Echo, the Free Press, and the Record. We have before us a copy of the first issue of the Tribune, which was preserved by Mrs. D. C. Everson, and kindly loaned to us for this occasion.

The Sentinel was the first paper published in Cawker (in 1872) by E. N. Emmons, in a lean-to on the west side of the Kelly House, west of the Speers corner. F. J. McMillan bought this paper in September 1872 and continued it until 1874; he occupied the second story of the Kelly House.

E. Harrison Cawker was the founder and editor of the Tribune, and it was issued on Saturday. On account of the press not arriving in time, this first number was printed at the office of the Beloit Gazette. J. J. Johnson was then editor of the Gazette. The Tribune office was in the first Odd Fellows building, which stood about where the photo gallery is now.

Topliff and DeYoung bought the Tribune material and began the publication of the Echo in August 1875 in the old land office....The Echo was independent in politics, but in January 1877 DeYoung sold his interest to A. L. Topliff, who continued its publication as a Republican paper until July 1878, when he sold it to Stephen De Young, who arrived in this city in August 1871. He changed the name of the paper to the Free Press, November 2, 1878, and continued it under that title until April 1883, when L. L. Alrich bought it and changed its name to the Public Record, which has continued until the present under the same management, never having missed an issue in the twenty-three and a half years....

 

...
April 18, 1907, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5058)

The following, in a circular, was distributed a week ago: " 'The Cawker City It,' an independent newspaper, will soon be started. Its mission will be to give the news, build up Cawker City and surrounding country, advertise Lincoln Park Chautauqua and boom Waconda Springs. Capital stock $2,500. The books for subscriptions are now open. Subscription price $1; first year 50 cents. New power press, new type and everything up-to-date will be purchased. A new building owned by the company will be erected." This announcement was anonymous and was therefore ignored last week, and for the reason that we didn't want to publish the infirmities of the community, but the circular was sent to other towns, and here is how some of our neighbors look at it.

"Cawker City is talking of another paper. Cawker City has already two fine papers that are doing all they can for Cawker. We would advise the businessmen of that place not to overdo things." -- Portis Independent.

"Cawker City is to have a new paper to be known as the 'Cawker City It.' We do not know who is to run it, but it sounds as if some crank had got the job of naming it. Cawker already has two papers, which is one too many." -- Jewell Republican.

...And here's what the K. C. Star says: "Cawker City is to have a new paper called the Cawker City It. this is not quite as bad as You All's Doin's, but almost."

Come along Mr. "It." We need a half dozen more papers here. The old reliable Record has outlived 14 competitors and we'll try to keep up its reputation.

 

...
July 18, 1907, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5074)

Osborne's first paper -- John L. Weber of Osborne has a copy of the Osborne City Times which was printed March 11, 1872, not numbered, but supposed to be one of the first issue; there were three thousand copies printed but the work was probably done in some other town as the old hand press was in use then in small towns and that would mean at least 12,000 impressions. It gives an account of the Pennsylvania colony that settled that town; the Osborne News last week published the account of their trip as first printed in the Times.

 

...
October 0, 1907, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5087)

Albert Reid's new magazine -- The September issue of Western Life, a Kansas monthly magazine published by the Post Publishing Company at Leavenworth, has just come from the press. It is the most elaborate and artistic periodical every published in Kansas.

Western Life will appear monthly and will be of a farm and home character. It is of the Saturday Evening Post style, consisting of 20 pages, printed on book paper and cover in colors....One of the strong features will be the illustrations of Albert T. Reid, the leading cartoonist of the West. Reid's pictures are always good "reading matter" in Kansas. The subscription price of Western Life is $1 a year. The Record has made a clubbing arrangement with the publishers whereby we can send both papers, Western Life and the Record, for $1.50 a year....

 

...
October 28, 1909, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5231)

Harry Root, representing the State Journal, was here last Friday attending the reunion of old soldiers, and we believe he was the youngest present, being only 16 years old at the time of his enlistment in the winter of 1864 in the 187th Pennsylvania Infantry. His regiment, with 14 other Pennsylvania regiments who participated in the battle of Cold Harbor, dedicated a monument on that battlefield Wednesday of last week.

 

...
April 0, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5255)

From a country editor to fame and riches is the luck of Ex-Governor Hoch of Kansas. Losing his fight for state printer made him governor. The governorship gave him a chance to get on the lecture platform. He is a good speaker and commanded a salary of $80 a lecture to talk about Kansas. People everywhere want to know about Kansas and no one can tell it better than Ed Hoch. His recent trip took in 13 states, covering a distance of 25,000 miles. He still has his paper, his home and his print shop in his old town of Marion, Kan. -- Smith County Pioneer.

 

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May 0, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5258)

Cawker City's Firsts....The city of Cawker was located in the fore part of March 1870....The location was made by R. G. F. Kshinka and J. P. Rice....During this time, J. J. Huckell was making up a colony in Pennsylvania to be located here, while E. H. Cawker was attending to various business connected with the enterprise, and was looking after the publication of the Cawker City Tribune at Milwaukee, Wis. This paper, the material of which was prepared by the parties above named, contained a general description of Kansas, but more particularly of Mitchell County and the Solomon Valley. This was the first advertised medium of the Solomon Valley, the paper of which heralded the glorious beauties and advantages of this valley from the Atlantic to the Rocky Mountains. -- Old Settler.

 

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June 2, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5265)

Ben Baker, editor of the Smith County Journal, is in such poor health that he is obliged to drop business for a while and go to Excelsior Springs. W. H. Nelson is in charge editorially of the Journal.

 

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August 18, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5281)

W. A. Huff, recent editor of the Beloit Times, whose list was bought by the Gazette, is editor of the Superior (Neb.) Journal. He was in Beloit last week and packed some of the outfit of the Times office and shipped it to Superior. The remainder of the type was taken to the high school by Professor Gregory to be used in the manual training class. This outfit was originally owned and used by J. W. McBride in publishing the old Cawker City Journal, after whose demise it was stored here a while and later moved to Beloit, where McBride started the Times.

 

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September 0, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5284)

Antiquity in newspaperdom -- A very interesting article touching on the antiquity of newspaper history was recently published in a New York paper. "The Pekin (China) King Choo (daily newspaper), preparing to celebrate its one thousandth birthday, it would seem interesting, in comparison, to discover the birthdays of newspapers among the Caucasian races. The most reliable information obtainable are as follows: Venice, Notizzi Scritti, 1566; Antwerp, Nieuwe Tigdingen, 1605; London, Weekly News, 1622; Paris, Gazette de France, 1631; London, Mercurius Civicus, 1643; Stockholm, Gazette de Suede, 1644; Leipzig, Leipziger Zeitung, 1660; London, Morning Post, probably 1772; London, Times, 1788. The last two dates represent the years when the famous dailies now in existence were founded under their present name, to be issued continuously ever since.

 

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December 0, 1910, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5302)

Winter 1910-1911 -- "The ideal newspaper, of course, does not exist; it is doubtful that it ever will, at least till the millennium. But I will tell you what I regard as the ideal newspaper. It is the home paper. It is a journal which is so filled with good thoughts that it finds a warm welcome and an eager reading wherever it goes. It is as free as possible from scandal and unwholesome things. It is not boastful, not too much given to fault finding. It wins the confidence of the people by its honesty, purity and progressiveness. It handles the news of the day in a manner that appeals to the better class of all people. It emphasizes the hopeful features of the news rather than the discordant ones. It has a reputation for truthfulness and accuracy. It has no personal ambition to promote, nor secret interests to serve, no private grudges to satisfy and is free to express its editorial opinion on public questions according to the unbiased dictates of its editorial conscience." -- Arthur Capper in Topeka Capital.

 

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January 5, 1911, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5305)

E. W. Howe, who founded the Atchison Globe 33 years ago, retired last Saturday from the business, giving half interest in the plant to his son, Eugene Howe, and selling the other half to R. A. Ramsay, a local merchant, Dr. Pitts and Chas. Linley, the latter becoming business manager. Pitts and Ramsay will not take an active interest. Ed Howe will retire to his Potato Hill mansion south of Atchison, and will there publish Smith's Quarterly, just for fun, and to be able to say what he pleases without being confined to the newspaper business. The Globe outfit has been valued at from $60,000 to $100,000.

The Wyandotte Herald, a weekly paper in Kansas City, Kan., the past 39 years, suspended publication, not for financial difficulties, but because the editor, V. J. Lane, did not want anyone outside his family to continue it. The retiring editor is over 80 years of age.

 

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January 11, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5565)

W. H. Nelson, old time editor of the Smith County Pioneer, has bought the Russell Record, another old time paper. He has been out of the harness the past dozen years and has had an itching to get back. He was one of the organizers of the original Northwest Kansas Editorial Association....

Clyde M. Robinson, editor of the Creek County Republican, Okla., formerly of Cawker City, has returned home from a recent visit to Kansas City....

 

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January 18, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5567)

Consolidation! "Consolidations are the order of the day where two or more papers are published in one town, but that won't work here; it takes two to make a bargain." -- Ledger. We have avoided hereto making any reply to similar articles as the above which have frequently appeared in our contemporary's columns, and now only do so to settle the matter finally. There will be no consolidation with the Record. When the time comes (as it must eventually) that this writer shall retire from his labor of love of over a third of a century, the paper and office material will be sold outright, not consolidated; there will be no "entangling alliances." We have had 15 competitors in the past 34 years and they all wanted to "consolidate." The Record is on a sound basis financially and none but the editor controls it. So let your "consolidation" idea flicker out. This is not to be a continued story; it is finished.

W. H. Nelson and John E. Merrian have bought the Russell Record....

 

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July 12, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5573)

Ben T. Baker, editor of the Smith County Journal, died at his home in Smith Center Monday, July 9, and was buried Tuesday. He was 50 years old and his wife survives him; no children. He was a son of W. A. Baker, who conducted a hotel in Cawker City in early days, coming here from Osborne County and later moving to Beloit....In the spring of 1886, Ben T. Baker began to learn the printing trade in the Record office, and continued with us some time; we found him a good reliable help, whom we could leave with our son in charge of the office....Later, Ben went to Denver and engaged in the printing business; and still later returned to Smith Center, where he established himself as the editor of the Journal, which he ably conducted until stricken down in his last illness.

The Appeal to Reason, published at Girard, has been barred from the mails, together with several others, because of their opposition to the war.

 

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October 25, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5578)

Levi L. Alrich, 34 years editor of the Cawker City Public Record. Mrs. Emma B. Alrich, 34 years associate editor....Knowing that he would like his last work to be as prompt on time as if he were living, the Record was issued on Thursday at the usual hour and the funeral was held on Friday. The rain the night previous laid the dust and at 1:30 p.m. the band, Masonic Lodge in regalia, and Reynolds Post took their places in line, the school children's line in two ranks filling an entire block, carrying the Flag for each division, and the large high school Flag. The others proceeded to the house, the band stationed in the front yard, all others opened ranks and, as the coffin was carried to the hearse, the notes of "Nearer My God to Thee" floated sweetly on the air....The light coffin was draped with the silk Post flag, and on it was the wreath...now surrounded with one of evergreen, on which rested the cap worn thru the 15 battles while he was a private of Co. B, 71st Pennsylvania Regiment, Second Corps....

 

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October 25, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5577)

Sudden Death of Levi L. Alrich -- Levi Lockard Alrich, son of Peter L. and Eliza L. Alrich, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., Oct. 5, 1840. His father died when he was eight years old, leaving five children from 5 to 12 years of age. His mother kept them in school through the summer grades, when Levi took the place of errand boy in a clothing store....

Levi had a mechanical turn of mind and an eye for the beautiful and an ambition to be an artist. When 17 years of age, he started "west;" coming down the Ohio River, he fell overboard on the Fourth of July and, reaching St. Louis, met a salesman who introduced him to J. M. Linn, an Indian trader, and he went with him to Fort Scott and to Osage Mission, now St. Paul, when Mother Bridget was the only white woman there and Father Ponzliona the priest in charge.

Going over to Linn's Mills and to the new town of Carthage, Mo., he was foreman of all business, dealing in furs, and when 20 years old patented a keyed faucet. The war of the rebellion becoming so apparent and secession sentiment so strong, he left for the East and in May 1861 enlisted under McClellan and took part in 15 battles, being sent home to die of dysentery and rheumatism.

Feb. 13, 1866, he was married at Cape May, C.H., N.J., to Miss Emma Eldridge, and was for eight years foreman of Richarson's umbrella factory, and for four years proprietor of a grocery store.

In 1876, he had charge of an exhibit in the Centennial grounds and the Kansas display made a strong call for him to return to Kansas, and in July 1878 he again started west, following the Central Branch railroad to Beloit; arrived in Cawker City Jan. 1879, where he was clerk until 1882, when he began to publish the Camp Fire, a soldier paper, and in April 1883 bought the Free Press, changing the name to the Public Record, and making Republicanism the chief feature.

For thirty-four and one-half years he has been instrumental in Cawker Township, holding the balance of power in Mitchell County, fearless in what he believed was right, condemning the wrong....He was in the longest continuous service in the Sixth District except W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record, who is only a few months longer.

In 1904, Mr. Alrich had a severe illness...and was confined to the house for nearly a year, having a great deal of pain in his head and sometimes unable to walk. Twice he set his time to die, making all preparations, but has lived to bury all the comrades he selected to take part in his funeral....

He was a great Bible student, compiling a genealogical Bible dictionary, accompanied by a chart, which had 4,000 names on it....He held the various offices of city councilman, school director, police judge, justice of the peace, postmaster four years under President McKinley. He is the last charter member of Reynolds Post, and for many years its adjutant, the past few years been continuous as commander, and the past year aide on the national staff of the Grand Army of the Republic. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge 28 years, a promoter of the Board of Trade of early years, as of the Commercial Club, and a week ago singed the Home Guard list....

February 1916 he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, when hundreds took part, and just two weeks later their only daughter, Rachel Candy, died suddenly....

Kind neighbors and friends...phoned for the son, A. G. Alrich of Lawrence, who arrived with his family at 9:00 p.m., when arrangements were made for the funeral in the Baptist Church on the 26th....

 

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December 6, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5580)

Retrospective. One of the most pleasant retrospective views of the 35 years in connection with the Record...is the number of young people whom we have inducted in the art preservative, and being the first woman in Cawker City to take up that line of work.

Our first lessons were to set type, act as roller boy for the old Washington hand press, conduct an educational column, do all the errands about town, catching locals as we could find them. We advanced far enough to be left in charge of the office while the editor in chief attended political conventions (which in days of horse and buggy transportation often required several days to attend the state and district conventions) and sometimes a pressman who had promised to be with us failed to arrive; our son would stand on a box to "roll" while mother did the press work. Our son, A. G. Alrich, and daughter, Miss Rae C. Alrich, both became skillful workers, the son having an artistic taste for the job work and the daughter a swift compositor.

The first outside of the family to assist us was Ben Baker, one who had been our high school pupil when we were superintendent of the public schools, and who became editor of the Smith County Journal for many years. When Mr. Alrich was given up to die in 1904, Ben wrote a sincere heartfelt obituary which Mr. Alrich treasured with numerous others, and a few months ago he in turn wrote Ben's obituary at his death only a short time before his own.

Rodem Baker, Ben's brother, after mastering the case and the press, climbed the editorial chair at Glen Elder and several years later left the work for mining investments in Joplin, Mo.

David Walling, with our son, were devoted members of the band during the big reunion in 1886....Dave was a Philippine soldier and, having a severe attack of typhoid fever....his last letter reached home some time after the news of his death....

Horace Pritner was jeered by the boys for undertaking so monotonous a life but he is still in office work at Calumet, Okla., and glad he became a printer.

Fred Everson...cheerfully took his broom as the last apprentice and heeded Horace's orders to "pick up the type before sweeping." He has generally followed his father's vocation, that of druggist....

Jewell Rogers was hardly large enough to reach the top of the case but had the stick-to-itiveness and is now Linotype operator on the Oklahoma City daily.

Mrs. Kate (Bruce) Myers, altho preferring to become a housekeeper, could soon resume her place at holding down a case.

Mrs. K... (Sutton) Braund, housekeeper in Montrose, Colo., chose the writer's side of the work, gathering spicy locals and corresponding for other papers....

Mrs. Maggie (Suter) Dial, faithful in all that she did, was married and died in Oklahoma....

Miss Ethel Hadley was at the case when the telephone was first put in at Cawker and preferred that keyboard to the a, b, c of the printers, so has been the chief Central operator for 10 years past.

Miss Stella Boyd chose to change to the lot of a farmer's wife....

Prof. Gregory astounded us by asking to spend his vacation time in the Record office, to begin at the bottom, washing rollers and doing boy's work. Ambitious, he opened the public schools in September, bought the Ledger of A. W. Robinson, but found the duties of school superintendent and editor are incompatible, resigning both, moved to another field and returned to his first love, teaching school.

J. B. Searle, our band leader for many years, found indoor life was not conducive to his health....

Mrs. Edna (Bays) Labore...made a proficient hand for a few years....

Phares Swartley preferred the mechanic part of the work and as the old Washington hand press had to be discarded for a Universal Galley press, kept the engine in good order in winters, running a threshing machine in summer.

Ralph Jennings liked to look over exchanges and invent something useful for the machinery.

Frances Hill, after four years with us, has gone up to a higher grade in the Crane Publishing Co. at Topeka.

Mrs. Edna (Johnston) Corder began with us after school hours while in the junior class...made a quick compositor and, after graduation, took a case at the Ledger office, remaining there after her marriage.

Miss Oddavene Rollins entered the office after graduating from high school in 1915 on part time, the past year on full time.

When school was fairly under way this year, Misses Hazel Johnson and Margaret Cissna applied to work after school hours....

After Mr. Alrich's death, Donovan Smith...thought the printing business was next in line and asked to be taken in on trial. He has been given the care of the press and to see how a job press performs.

Last month, Mrs. C. T. McCoy came in to look around and we thought she was joking when she spoke of wanting to learn to set type, but she meant serious business and finds it fascinating.

...Time would fail us to tell of the different roller boys and press men who came in for a few hours on press day, as their name is legion....

 

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December 27, 1917, Cawker City Public Record (ID 5582)

The Record has loyally flown the flag at the head of its columns...now say GOODBYE....It can be truly said of the editors of the Cawker City Public Record that they "have finished the work that was given them to do."...We take up the forms for the last time and drop a silent tear in relinquishing the editorial chair....The Cawker City Public Record has been issued for the last time....The Record is 34 years and 10 months old. It has never missed an issue, never had a lawsuit of any kind, never had a prize contest of any kind to gain subscribers, and wish we could go out rejoicing "peace on earth." The Washington hand press brought by Col. E. Harrison Cawker from Milwaukee to this city in 187? was considered too sacred to be broken up for old iron and, at the suggestion of our son, A. G. Alrich, arrangements were made for it to become the property of the State Historical Society at Topeka....The terms of sale are that the subscription list is turned over to Robert Good as all paid to Jan. 1, 1918. Those who have not paid to that time will pay Mrs. Alrich. Those who are paid in advance will have their money refunded from January if they will call at the office. Mrs. Alrich will be found in the office every Saturday to receive calls from old friends. Mrs. Alrich will not sell her home or leave Cawker City but still takes a deep interest in all civic affairs....